The Latest

rubyetc:

sketches for a thing
Sep 14, 2014 / 30,882 notes

rubyetc:

sketches for a thing

(via backonpointe)

Sep 14, 2014 / 80 notes

ibringmotivation:

Hello lovelies! A new video is up on my channel and it’s my favourite, healthy lunch recipe that’s perfect to prepare and store in lunch boxes for school or work. You can add or remove anything you like, this is just what I prefer to combine :) I really hope you’ll try it out as well, it’s so delicious! :)xx

(via ibringmotivation)

thecurvynutritarian:

Adult woman craft time! Made some lovely fridgespiration :-) some of my nutritarian guidelines and reminders. I’m planning to succeed people! #thecurvynutritarian #nutritarian #weightloss #eattolive
Sep 11, 2014 / 11 notes

thecurvynutritarian:

Adult woman craft time! Made some lovely fridgespiration :-) some of my nutritarian guidelines and reminders. I’m planning to succeed people! #thecurvynutritarian #nutritarian #weightloss #eattolive

thecurvynutritarian:

http://www.drfuhrman.com/library/what-is-a-nutritarian-diet.aspx
Sep 11, 2014 / 20 notes
revampingthevixen:

Handy Portion Size Guide!
Sep 10, 2014 / 14 notes

revampingthevixen:

Handy Portion Size Guide!

Sep 10, 2014 / 29 notes
kateruns-theworld:

From Dr. Joel Fuhrman’s book, “Eat To Live”
Sep 9, 2014 / 25 notes

kateruns-theworld:

From Dr. Joel Fuhrman’s book, “Eat To Live”

Sep 9, 2014 / 180 notes
Sep 8, 2014 / 10 notes
We love meal bowls! They’re an easy, versatile and nutritious way to think about breakfast, lunch or dinner. Just follow the basic formula of grain + green + protein, and the possible combinations are endless. Putting together a meal bowl is easy, and we’ve assembled some tips and inspiration to make it even easier.
the base
Start building your bowl with a sturdy foundation. Whole grains, seeds, noodles and starchy vegetables are all good choices. The base should make up about a third of your bowl or less. Try whole grains such as brown rice, wheat berries, spelt berries, barley or oats. Seeds such as amaranth, millet and quinoa also work well, and are good choices for grain-free meals. Similarly, starchy root vegetables such as yams, sweet potatoes and parsnips make a great base when roasted, steamed or mashed. If you’re going with noodles, try buckwheat, rice or kelp noodles for something different.
Tip: If you’re cooking whole grains for your meal bowl, cook extra and freeze the extra in individual portions. And, if you’d prefer a lighter meal bowl, you can always skip the base and go straight to the greens! Speaking of…
the greens
They don’t necessarily have to be green, but try to make vegetables at least one-third of your bowl. Leafy greens such as spinach, kale and chard can be quite bulky, so they make for a good middle layer to be topped with other vegetables. Try adding vegetables in various forms: raw, shredded, steamed and stir-fried are all great options.
Tip: Sturdier greens like kale will soften up a bit when they are added to a hot grain base. A more delicate green (like arugula) may wilt more than you like, so it might be better added to a cold or room-temperature base.
the protein
The world is your vegetarian oyster when it comes adding protein – the remaining third of your meal bowl. If you’re keeping it vegan, try baked, stir-fried or roasted tofu, tempeh or seitan. Beans and pulses also work, either whole or whirled into a hummus or dip. Other protein options include cheeses such as feta, halloumi, paneer or cottage cheese. Or you could top your meal bowl with a poached or fried egg.
the extras
A good dressing can really make your bowl sing. There are so many choices, from hummus and tahini, to salsa and hot sauce, to a salty soy-based sauce. You can also sprinkle your bowl with nuts and seeds, which add both crunch and extra protein. Or, try crumbling fresh herbs or dried seaweed over the top of your bowl for something a little different.
Source
Sep 8, 2014

We love meal bowls! They’re an easy, versatile and nutritious way to think about breakfast, lunch or dinner. Just follow the basic formula of grain + green + protein, and the possible combinations are endless. Putting together a meal bowl is easy, and we’ve assembled some tips and inspiration to make it even easier.

the base

Start building your bowl with a sturdy foundation. Whole grains, seeds, noodles and starchy vegetables are all good choices. The base should make up about a third of your bowl or less. Try whole grains such as brown rice, wheat berries, spelt berries, barley or oats. Seeds such as amaranth, millet and quinoa also work well, and are good choices for grain-free meals. Similarly, starchy root vegetables such as yams, sweet potatoes and parsnips make a great base when roasted, steamed or mashed. If you’re going with noodles, try buckwheat, rice or kelp noodles for something different.

Tip: If you’re cooking whole grains for your meal bowl, cook extra and freeze the extra in individual portions. And, if you’d prefer a lighter meal bowl, you can always skip the base and go straight to the greens! Speaking of…

the greens

They don’t necessarily have to be green, but try to make vegetables at least one-third of your bowl. Leafy greens such as spinach, kale and chard can be quite bulky, so they make for a good middle layer to be topped with other vegetables. Try adding vegetables in various forms: raw, shredded, steamed and stir-fried are all great options.

Tip: Sturdier greens like kale will soften up a bit when they are added to a hot grain base. A more delicate green (like arugula) may wilt more than you like, so it might be better added to a cold or room-temperature base.

the protein

The world is your vegetarian oyster when it comes adding protein – the remaining third of your meal bowl. If you’re keeping it vegan, try baked, stir-fried or roasted tofu, tempeh or seitan. Beans and pulses also work, either whole or whirled into a hummus or dip. Other protein options include cheeses such as feta, halloumi, paneer or cottage cheese. Or you could top your meal bowl with a poached or fried egg.

the extras

A good dressing can really make your bowl sing. There are so many choices, from hummus and tahini, to salsa and hot sauce, to a salty soy-based sauce. You can also sprinkle your bowl with nuts and seeds, which add both crunch and extra protein. Or, try crumbling fresh herbs or dried seaweed over the top of your bowl for something a little different.

Source

Busy day? No time for food? You are too important to eat junk to “make you feel better”. You will wind up feeling bad … Plan ahead. Always.
The Reluctant RawFoodist  (via thereluctantrawfoodist)

(via thereluctantrawfoodist)

Sep 8, 2014 / 99 notes
naturallyglo:

Berry Goodness
Sep 8, 2014 / 9 notes

naturallyglo:

Berry Goodness

Sep 8, 2014 / 205 notes

cheapveg:

Nutritarianism: a diet made for efficient eating

Dr. Fuhrman, physician, nutritional researcher and author of NY Times best seller “Eat To Live”, has developed a new diet and food pyramid based on efficient eating. That is, eating the least amounts of foods for the highest nutritional gain. His method for determining these foods is as simple as his explanation:

"Health = Nutrients / Calories (H = N / C). Low-calorie, nutrient dense foods are at the base of the pyramid, and high-calorie, nutrient poor foods are at the top. As nutrient density decreases, the quantity of room in the diet decreases.” (source)

Dr. Fuhrman is a researcher in preventative health, and believes that many diseases like cancer, heart disease, and diabetes can be prevented by a high nutrient-rich diet. He has developed his own food pyramid (pictured above) and challenged the USDA’s food pyramid saying that it, “reflects the American diet as it is” not how it should be.

Many Americans are eating high quantities of low-nutrient and high calorie foods such as snack foods, dairy products, and red meat. He calls these types of foods “toxic foods” and he means this literally. These are the foods that lead to many fatal diseases. He explains that eating these foods “leads to increased cellular toxicity with undesirable levels of free radicals and advanced glycation end products (AGE’s), lipofuscin, lipid A2E and other toxins that contribute to the development of chronic disease.”(source) The after effects are another stage he calls “toxic hunger” that is the desire to eat more low nutrient foods, and lots of them. This is a huge factor in weight gain as well as the reason calorie counting diets are not sustainable.

Fuhrman is not the first person to suggest this type of diet, many whole foodists like Dr. Colin Campbell, Dr. Robert Lustig, and countless other preventative health researchers suggest that whole foods should replace the standard meat and potatoes for improved health and a longer lifespan. 

To find out more about the Nutritarian Diet visit www.drfuhrman.com

neva-gets-fit:

Dinner tonight! Spinach, red onion, tomatoes from our garden, and 1 can tuna drizzled with olive oil and balsamic, plus Italian herbs for extra flavor. So refreshing and light after a hard workout!
Sep 8, 2014 / 18 notes

neva-gets-fit:

Dinner tonight! Spinach, red onion, tomatoes from our garden, and 1 can tuna drizzled with olive oil and balsamic, plus Italian herbs for extra flavor. So refreshing and light after a hard workout!

Sep 8, 2014 / 141 notes

(via veganlove)